gig economy

6 Reasons Why Your Coffee Shop is Engine of Economic Growth

The “gig economy” is triumphing over everything else. As that trend gathers force and there is no reason why it should not, people who work for themselves are going to become an ever-more powerful economic and political force.

This “sharing” economy, pioneered by the likes of Uber and Airbnb, is opening up vast new opportunities for working for yourself; so is the spread of broadband, and well-funded start-ups – all those “unicorns”, the billion-plus dollar start-ups – love to take on lots of freelancers and don’t object to paying them pretty well

The rise of the “gig economy” will prove to be a powerful social trend, both in the UK and in most of the developed work. It shows no sign of slowing down – and it is going to impact the economy and the political system far more than most people yet realise.

  1.  Coffee shops are about work in another way, too: the rise of the “gig economy” – the proliferation of freelance workers, digital contractors and entrepreneurs who don’t have an office and can’t afford to rent one – has been crucial in shaping their new role.
  2. With a new generation of gourmets emerging in the UK aged 18- 35 years old. These consumers are keen on food and drink with an authentic or distinctive positioning.
  3. People’s Palate are changing none more so than how we enjoy our coffee, With more people purchasing barista style machines for their homes and purchasing more and more international origin coffees.
  4. With the high street moving away from pre-blended Italian style coffee, The industry is in the curiosity for the “science” of coffee making—improving grinding methods, better monitoring of water quality, and the types of beans that make up blends, allowing customers to better identify with taste and content of what they are drinking.
  5. The High Street is transforming and commentators see the high street is transforming from a pure shopping destination to a centre for “leisure and services” as the dramatic rise of the Internet changes the retail landscape.
  6. The role of technology in food service has changed dramatically in the past few years, and no more so than in the UK, where mobile technology has infiltrated many aspects of regular consumer behaviour.

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