The Madock Centre Perthshire – A Place For Skill and Innovation

Deputy First Minister of Scotland and the Cabinet Secretary for Education and Skills.

The coffee available at The Madock Centre joins the growing number of coffee locations that help boost innovation to the local economy. More people are working out of coffee shops thus coining the new term “coffice”. Rather than commuting to a boring old office, they take their laptops to their local coffee shops where they can tap and work.

More people are working out of coffee shops thus coining the new term, “Coffice”. Rather than commuting to a boring old office, they take their laptops to their local coffee shops where they can tap

The official opening was attended by Deputy First Minister of Scotland and the Cabinet Secretary for Education and Skills. 

Blendly the commercial coffee roaster understand that More people are working out of coffee shops thus coining the new term, “Coffice”. Rather than commuting to a boring old office, they take their laptops to their local coffee shops where they can tap into the internet with wifi and power outlets to recharge devices – with great coffee to recharge oneself. The size of the “office” economy is extensive, as four out of five Brits have worked from a coffee shop and do so regularly.

The Madock Centre is improving the quality of life for local residents by providing recreational facilities – it is also providing a hub for innovation – as well as combating social isolation, acting as a social hub, community cafe and a place for community groups to meet.

The Madock Centre is more than just a community centre, it is a community heart, this spectacular new facility was developed with the community in mind and provides high quality, purpose-built recreational, conference and meeting place in the heart of the Perthshire countryside.

This superb destination caters to everyone from the business traveller looking for state of the art facility or informal meeting – to a location for parents to relax and meet with family and friends.

Nestled in the heart of Perthshire– Situated perfectly as a base for the great outdoors and represents the ideal spot to meet and plan those outdoor adventures.

The Madock Centre is also about great coffee – working with Blendly they have developed their own special taste. Blendly is a speciality coffee roasters that specialises in creating speciality coffee blends for the growing market. The company provide be-spoke coffee blends all over Scotland

Coffee is at the heart of a great coffee destination and for centuries coffee has been a medium for relationships. travelers have long gathered over coffee with family or friends to talk about things good and bad.

The Madock Centre developed its blend with the help of www.Blendly.co.uk. It allows its customers to select and make a coffee blend unique to themselves according to their choice of beans to create a great and unique coffee.

Al Duomo Brighton Developed a Unique Coffee Blend with Blendly

Al Duomo is one of Brighton’s most popular and long-established Italian restaurants where coffee has always been at the heart of its service. Al Duomo is ran by the Taverna family. They have trusted Blendly to create The Al Duomo Dark Italian Espresso.

Their blend was developed by Blendly speciality coffee roasters that specialise in creating speciality coffee blends for the growing number of restaurants, coffee shops and baristas. Fresher, quicker, better and more transparent coffee.

At Al Duomo coffee is at the heart of a great coffee experience. Located  in Brighton where according to reports Brightonians are the biggest coffee drinkers in the UK, spending an average of £177 a head per year,

Blendly.co.uk  allows its customers such as Al Duomo to select and make a coffee blend unique to them self according to their choice of beans and their pallets to create products unique to the customers.

                                 Al Duomo has been serving great coffee to over 4.5 million customers and continues to be a much loved local family run Italian Pizzeria, With a philosophy was good food, good service and value for money. –At Al Duomo Its coffee is an important part of its Menu. As it source products direct from the best suppliers and working with blendly.co.uk  we have unique and transparent coffee product that underpins our philosophy

The UK coffee shop market has enjoyed its biggest period of growth since 2008. Over the last five years, the market rose by 37%, up from £2.4 billion in 2011 to reach an impressive £3.4 billion in 2016 Food restaurants and sandwich shops have increased sales of the hot drink three times faster than specialist outlets over the last nine years

And with each coffee customer spending an average of £2,160 a year working from coffee shops – but we close business deals worth £14.5bn to the UK economy’ Findings from the research included – Coffee is an important product

Al Duomo Offer a warm, friendly, Italian atmosphere with authentic Italian restaurant food. The restaurant, bar, and coffee shop is open 363 days a year ” and Al Duomo understands Coffee-shopping “is a trend that’s disrupting the traditional brick and mortar retail experience. When customers are coffee shopping, they peruse in-stock items on a tablet, rather than on the shelves and racks of a retailer. It’s so named for the social, cafe-like, atmosphere that’s designed to entice shoppers to spend time in physical locations.

Coffee Blends vs Single Origins – It’s All to Enjoy

Why Do Coffee Roasters Favour Blends?

Why is it that it is rare to walk into a café and get your coffee made from just Ethiopian coffee beans, or just Costa Rican coffee beans? Simply put, roasters try to give their consumers the best of a few different beans to make the coffee as complex as possible. A coffee with good mouthfeel (eg Brazil) is no good without aroma (add some Papuan New Guinea) or aftertaste (add some Mexican Altura). Coffee aficionados love tasting single origin coffees to taste the nuances in those coffees, but if you are a café trying to maximize your revenue by satisfying as many people as possible, you will want to give them espresso with mouthfeel, aroma, aftertaste, good crema, acidity and smoothness but not bitterness.

Simply put, roasters try to give their consumers the best of a few different beans to make the coffee as complex as possible. A coffee with good mouthfeel (eg Brazil) is no good without aroma (add some Papuan New Guinea) or aftertaste (add some Mexican Altura). Coffee aficionados love tasting single origin coffees to taste the nuances in those coffees, but if you are a café trying to maximize your revenue by satisfying as many people as possible, you will want to give them espresso with mouthfeel, aroma, aftertaste, good crema, acidity and smoothness but not bitterness.

Think of a coffee roaster like a chef mixing in many ingredients to make his/her signature dish. Those ingredients (for arguments’ sake let’s say they are celery sticks, cream, butter, pumpkin, spices and stock) on their own are not overly inviting, but mixed together and cooked for the right amount of time and they transform into an amazing gourmet cream soup that can fetch $20 a bowl at a good restaurant! Just as a chef tries to create synergy (the end product being much better than the sum of its individual parts), so too does a coffee roaster.

Roasters can create blends for complementarity sometimes and at other times to create contrasts – depending of course on what their wholesale customer may think their consumers would be interested in drinking. They may find a couple of beans that go really nicely together, such as Ethiopian and Brazilian and another couple that stand in stark contrast with each other such as Sumatran and Kenyan and tailor blends based on those similarities and differences.

What is really interesting about the blending process is that a roaster’s blend may need to change from time to time and the large coffee companies will have cuppers who continually cup their blends to ensure that their integrity of the blend does not change over time. For example the roaster may use a Guatemalan bean from a particular plantation in their signature blend. Over time, the taste of the roasted beans from that plantation may change due to a number of factors: climate change, a change in the way those beans have been fermented, dried or stored or a change in the soil conditions. This in turn will impact on the overall taste of the roaster’s blend. Now the roaster won’t want the overall taste of the blend to change because they have loyal wholesale customers who like it and they in turn want to keep their paying customers satisfied from week to week. This will mean that the roaster will have to re-assess those Guatemalan beans and either substitute them with something else or change their weighting in the blend.

The golden rule for roasters is to create a flavour profile and be consistent with it.Examples of some blends we have created in the past and which we now use in our training rooms can be found on the blendly.co.uk

Examples of some blends we have created in the past and which we now use in our training rooms can be found on the blendly.co.uk

When is Coffee Blended – Before or after Roasting?
Some argue that blending pre-roasting can achieve a unique coming-together of flavours that cannot be achieved by roasting individual origins then blending. Beans that have been blended before roasting are typically characterised by all being the same colour.

Others argue that you have to maximise the flavour of each origin as they will not all want the same time in the roasting chamber. Beans that have been blended after roasting are typically characterised by being different colours.

Generally, blending post roasting occurs because:
– A small bean will roast at a different rate to a large bean
– Beans with different “hardness” or density will roast at different rates
– Beans with different moisture contents will roast at different rates

As past coffee roasters ourselves, to be honest, there is no right answer. Most roasters these days practice both methods depending on which beans they are using.

Single Origins vs Blends – Which type of coffee is better?
Purists would argue that you cannot top a great single origin coffee and that you must be very careful not to destroy the greatness of a coffee by mixing it carelessly with another.

But most coffee companies in Australia sell blends therefore arguably blends must be better. These companies probably want to offer their wholesale cafe customers and in turn their consumers a complex tasting coffee, giving them more than just one attribute that a single origin may be able to offer them.

At the end of the day though, nobody can say that one particular coffee is better than another or one blend any better than another. All we know is that if you have a half-decent machine even at home, buying single origins after drinking blends all your life can be a refreshing experience and a thoroughly enriching one. but the Choice is up to you 

 

The Michelin Guide – The Dalmore Inn and Restaurant – The Home of Great Coffee with Blendly

The Dalmore Inn’s growing community of food and coffee lovers are one of the growing number of destination that offer great freshly roasted coffee from Blendly.

The Dalmore Inn is also home of the great entertainment with regular local events and wine tastings and is the home of the Local wine club

Blendly the commercial coffee roaster understand that more people are looking for more choice and with pallets changing and with the selection of quality food being made available, Blendly allow its customers to create their own coffee experience and have it delivered fresh.

Allowing them to explore the flavours of diffrent beans and roasts is part of the blendly coffee experiance and  with Quality food and service at the top of The Dalmore Inn’s agenda They understand that more and more top establishments and restaurants have increased sales of the hot drink three times faster than specialist outlets, By Creating coffee blends that are unique to them and there customer

The UK coffee shop market has enjoyed its biggest period of growth since 2008. Over the last five years, the market rose by 37%, up from £2.4 billion in 2011 to reach an impressive £3.4 billion in 2016

According to Mintel The UK consumers’ love of coffee shops, for some, the draw of the kitchen remains too tempting. Half (51%) of coffee drinkers prefer to drink hot drinks at home rather than out-of-home, including 55% of men and 47% of women.  – The opportunity to drink and post your own coffee blend has much appeal to coffee customers

Research, conducted, discovered that 81 per cent of us spend roughly three and a half hours working from a coffee shop every week

“Coffee-shopping” is a trend that’s disrupting the traditional brick and mortar retail experience. When customers are coffee-shopping, they peruse in-stock items on a tablet, rather than on the shelves and racks of a retailer. It’s so named for the social, cafe-like, atmosphere that’s designed to entice shoppers to spend time in physical locations.